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Warren County Schools, TN

 "One Team, One Goal, High Levels of Learning for All"

Child-Serving Facility Integrated Pest Management

IPM - intergrated pest management logo

Below are newsletters that will serve as an information resource to help you choose the most effective methods of integrating IPM into your institution.

2016-2017 School Year

August 2016 UT Youth Environment and Health Newsletter (main topic: Nine-Banned Armadillo spreading across Tenn.))

October 2016 UT Youth Environment and Health Newsletter (main topic: IPM seeks Schools Demonstration Sites)

December 2016 UT Youth Environment and Health Newsletter (main topic: Bed Bugs)

February 2017 UT Youth Environment and Health Newsletter (main topic: Trained School IPM Management Technicians)

April 2017 UT Youth Environment and Health Newsletter (main topic: Head Lice)

July 2017 UT Youth Environment and Health Newsletter (main topic: 2017 School Site Surveys)

September 2017 UT Youth Environment and Health Newsletter (main topic: preparing for Fall Invaders)

November 2017 UT Youth Environment and Health Newsletter (main topic: fleas in classrooms)

Integrated Pest Management (IPM) aims to reduce and balance exposure to pests and pesticides and is a process that extends beyond the application of pesticides to include reduction of food, water, shelter, and in-building access used by pests. In an IPM program, pest populations are prevented; pesticides are used only when needed; the least hazardous pesticide that effectively manages the targeted pests is selected; and pesticides are directed to areas not accessible to children, staff, parents or other building occupants.

Children are physiologically more vulnerable to pesticides. Children can spend long hours at school, seven or more hours a day, and up to 12 hours a day at a childcare center, and therefore have an increased risk of pesticide exposure if pesticides have been applied in a manner incompatible with integrated pest management (IPM).